Oh, hey.

Introduction

 

 

How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.

Annie Dillard

Holy crap, sweatpants are comfortable.

Ellen Hunter Gans

 

 

LS

et's get right to the point: Maybe you don't hate your job, but the thought of showing up day after day, week after week, year after year as you trudge toward retirement makes you a little nauseous.

 

Is this really all there is? Cubicles and bosses and commutes and tiny annual raises and team-building activities and awkward small-talk at the communal bathroom sink and Ralph two cubes over who insists on eating stinky lunch at his desk EVERY @#$%& DAY?

 

Barf.

 

Here's a better idea:

Set your own hours
Work from home—or the beach…
Be your own boss
Do work you actually enjoy (most of the time)
Work as much or as little as you want
Eat your stinky or non-stinky lunch whenever and wherever you darn well please
Never be unemployed again
Enjoy unlimited income potential
Take unlimited vacation time
WEAR. SWEATPANTS. TO. WORK.

 

This, my friends, is called being self-employed. In this book, I’ll mostly call it freelancing. Freelancing is glorious. And potentially very, very lucrative.

 

I'm going to help you figure out:

a)If freelancing is right for you; and

b)How to do it the right way.

 

I want to address two things right up front.

 

First:

There are plenty of traditional gigs that will allow you to work from home. That’s definitely an upgrade over a cubicle, but it still means you’re beholden to the confines of a regular gig.

 

I’m talking about building your own solo career and being your own boss.[1]

 

Second:

I'm not knocking traditional gigs.

 

There are a lot of cool jobs out there. If you have engaging, satisfying work that you love and have no desire to do something else, let me give you a big high-five and bro hug.

 

But, since you bought this book, I'm guessing you are at least a wee bit curious about what else might be out there.

 

Now, on to the good stuff

Here's what you'll be rewarded with if you stick with me through the next 113 teeny, tiny pages. No fluff, no filler, just real, actionable strategies.

 

 

It'll fly by, I promise. By the end, you may well be ready to hand in your two weeks' notice. (But don't do that just yet. Find out why on page 74.) We’ll talk about how to:

 

Decide if being your own boss makes sense for you
Identify your ideal line of work
Create your brand
Price your services
Find clients
Manage your time
Win at life*

 

Quit your job.

   It's your lucky day!

   Here's the introduction to six figures in sweatpants.

OH, hey.

How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.

—Annie Dillard



Holy crap, sweatpants are comfortable.

—Ellen Hunter Gans

 
Let's get right to the point: Maybe you don't hate your job, but the thought of showing up day after day, week after week, year after year as you trudge toward retirement makes you a little nauseous.

Is this really all there is? Cubicles and bosses and commutes and tiny annual raises and team-building activities and awkward small-talk at the communal bathroom sink and Ralph two cubes over who insists on eating stinky lunch at his desk EVERY @#$%& DAY?

Barf.

Here's a better idea:


  • Set your own hours
  • Work from home—or the beach…
  • Be your own boss
  • Do work you actually enjoy (most of the time)
  • Work as much or as little as you want
  • Eat your stinky or non-stinky lunch whenever and wherever you darn well please
  • Never be unemployed again
  • Enjoy unlimited income potential
  • Take unlimited vacation time
  • WEAR. SWEATPANTS. TO. WORK.


 

This, my friends, is called being self-employed. In this book, I’ll mostly call it freelancing. Freelancing is glorious. And potentially very, very lucrative.

I'm going to help you figure out:

a) If freelancing is right for you; and

b) How to do it the right way.

 

I want to address two things right up front.
 

First:

There are plenty of traditional gigs that will allow you to work from home. That’s definitely an upgrade over a cubicle, but it still means you’re beholden to the confines of a regular gig.

I’m talking about building your own solo career and being your own boss.


Second:

I'm not knocking traditional gigs.

There are a lot of cool jobs out there. If you have engaging, satisfying work that you love and have no desire to do something else, let me give you a big high-five and bro hug.

But, since you bought this book, I'm guessing you are at least a wee bit curious about what else might be out there.

 

Now, on to the good stuff

Here's what you'll be rewarded with if you stick with me through this blissfully fast read. No fluff, no filler, just real, actionable strategies.

It'll fly by, I promise. By the end, you may well be ready to hand in your two weeks' notice. (But don't do that just yet. Find out why later.) We’ll talk about how to:


  • Decide if being your own boss makes sense for you
  • Identify your ideal line of work
  • Create your brand
  • Price your services
  • Find clients
  • Manage your time
  • Win at life*


*Ahem. I may have gotten a wee bit carried away there.

 

This book is for you

While I am indeed a freelancer, this book is not about me. It’s about you. I use my own experiences to provide context, but I’ll also offer plenty of research and practical advice.

Why should you listen to me?

You don’t have to. It’s your call. I wrote this book because I’m frequently asked about my job, and I finally decided to write it all down. 

From a “qualifications” standpoint, I have a few useless advanced degrees from reasonably fancy schools. More importantly, I built a freelance writing business from scratch that took me from unemployment to consistently earning well over six figures per year.

Then again, I also watch bad reality TV, and I spent the first 25 years of my life mispronouncing the word “component.” So consider yourself duly warned.

If you need any more convincing, consider the fact that I drafted much of this book while sitting on a lounge chair in a rented house overlooking the ocean in Costa Rica while a very nice lady named Jocanda made guacamole for me. That, my friends, is the beauty of self-employment.

Still interested? Cool. Let’s do this.